News Article

District Receives $20,000 Colorado State Conservation Board Grant - Next Phase Soil Observations

The Colorado State Conservation Board announced the award of a $20,000 matching grant to Mosca- Hooper Conservation District to support the Aquifer Recovery/Future of Ag in the San Luis Valley Field and Soil Observations: Fungal Rich Compost in 2020.  We were able to leverage matching funds recently received from the New Belgium Family Foundation, Community Foundation for San Benito County, Calhoun/Christiano Fund as part of the match for this particular grant.  The focus of of this next phase grant in 2020, will be to collect and correlate data where fungal rich compost has been applied an

Mosca-Hooper Conservation District Receives Grant Funding to Expand Pilot Hydrogeology Study

The Mosca-Hooper Conservation District has been awarded a $43,000 grant from the Rio Grande Basin Account of the Colorado Water Conservation Board to expand upon the San Luis Valley Recharge Optimization Pilot Project, a hydrogeology study to inform site-specific groundwater recharge potential in the San Luis Valley.

Grant funds from MillerCoors in the amount of $10,000 and from the Colorado State Conservation Board in the amount of $20,265 have been previously awarded to allow this project to begin in spring 2019.

Employment Opportunity

Mosca-Hooper Conservation District is currently seeking a qualified, highly skilled individual with a passion for conservation to fill the District Manager role. This is a part-time position at 24-hours-per-week, flexible except for required regular evening board and other meetings/events occasionally. Please submit a resume and letter of interest either by mail, to: MHCD, 101 S. Craft Dr., Alamosa, CO 81101 or by email, to: moscahoopercd1@gmail.com. Please use DISTRICT MANAGER in the subject line.

Participatory Soil Health Evaluations in the San Luis Valley

Participatory Soil Health Evaluations in the San Luis Valley Background In Colorado’s high-elevation, cold and extremely arid San Luis Valley, irrigated crop production involves mainly potatoes, spring-seeded small grains, and forage. The situation includes declining groundwater availability, increasingly variable weather, and a generally high cost of maintaining productive soils.